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Faults in the American Staffordshire Terrier

"Faults to be penalized are Dudley nose, light or pink eyes, tail to long or badly carried, undershot or overshot mouths."

     A Dudley nose is an unpigmented flesh colored nose. Light eyes are eyes other than dark brown. Pink eyes would be like and albino ( not generally seen). Tail length reaching below the hocks would be too long. Badly carried would be a tail carried too high about the level of the back, curved over the back, curled, or carried tucked under the belly. Undershot or overshot mouths – upper teeth not meeting closely in front of the lower teeth.

     Any deviation from the standard should be considered faulty. The degree of fault would depend upon the degree of deviation. Although not specifically mentioned as a fault by the standard, an improper temperament is the most undesirable quality possible, and should never be rewarded. The ideal specimen must always display courage and confidence to a marked degree. Absolutely no consideration should be give to an exhibit that lacks this quality. No consideration should be give to an exhibit that appears aggressive, threatening, or shy towards humans. These are completely incorrect for the breed and are inexcusable.

      In addition, a dog whose physical characteristics or lack of soundness make him unsuitable according to the general description should not be considered for placement. In general, proper temperament is the most important quality, followed by proper physical structure, and the soundness that must accompany it.

     Such faults as light eyes, long tail, improper nose color, less favored coat color are considered rather cosmetic in nature, and do not interfere with the animal’s suitability for work. Although these qualities are the only ones listed under faults, they should not carry as much weight as the proper temperament and structure of the breed – essential qualities that are well describe in the standard.